Random Walk Imaging
2017.11.13

Publication: A phantom for validation

We are proud to announce that in a newly published paper in Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, our academic partner Dr. Markus Nilsson, together with several other partners, collaborators, and our CEO, Dr. Karin Bryskhe, present a phantom capable of validating MRI pulse sequences and data processing methods to quantify microstructure in the human brain. Very useful, in other words!

For more information please contact:

Dr. Markus Nilsson

Associate Senior Lecturer at the Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Lund University

Other News

Comparison of the NODDI method and the CODIVIDE method.

Publication: Entangled information with conventional MRI

Our collaborators, Björn Lampinen et al., have published an interesting article in NeuroImage, where our academic partner Markus Nilsson is senior author. This paper discusses how conventional diffusion MRI entangles information on the microscopic scale, and how this can result in parameter bias in other methods.

Publication: Quantification of exchange in cell suspensions

Our colleague, Dr. Samo Lasič, is the senior author of a paper published by Stefanie Eriksson et al. in PLOS One. The authors measure water transport across cell membranes, using a refined version of our exchange method, particularly crucial when comparing different cell cultures. Check it out!

Publication: Resolution limit of cylinder diameter estimation by diffusion MRI

Our colleague, Dr. Samo Lasič, and three of our academic partners, Dr. Markus Nilsson, Prof. Daniel Topgaard, and Prof. Carl-Fredrik Westin, have together with Dr. Ivana Drobnjak published their work on how to make novel diffusion encoding methods feasible in clinical settings, when aiming to accurately estimate smaller structures within the body. Once a structure, […]

Publication: the Background story

Do you wish to revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to get a proper background of the methods that Random Walk Imaging have produced? Then you should read this recently published article by our academic collaborator, Prof. Daniel Topgaard.